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Things to do in Nepal.

Nepal is one of the most gorgeous countries in the world, which have highly diverse and rich geography, culture, and religions. The mountainous north contains eight of the world's ten highest mountains, including the highest, Mount Everest. The fertile and humid south is heavily urbanized. By some measures, Hinduism is practiced by a greater majority of people in Nepal than in any other nation. Its remarkable locales stand in beautiful contrast to its ancient temples and monasteries. Nepal Travel is one of the preferred selection for those coming to Asia on holiday tours. Apart from sightseeing tours of its wonderful monuments, the country offers numerous other options to the tourists to enjoy themselves fully.


For instance, one can indulge in trekking, hiking, camping, Adventure Tour, climbing, mountain biking, river rafting, fishing, etc. There are also a number of national parks and wildlife sanctuaries in Nepal, which serve as a pleasure for nature lovers. One thing is for sure, once you visit the country, you will not be able to get it out of your memory for a long time to come, so visiting once is not enough.


  • Trekking in Nepal
  • Nepal has some of the best trekking in the world, to and around several of the world's highest mountains, including Mount Everest. Many people visit the country just to trek and the tourism industry is well prepared to facilitate all manner of trekking styles and destinations. On the one hand you could spend a year planning an expedition to wild and lofty places; on the other you could land in Kathmandu with no plans and be on the trail to Everest Base Camp (EBC) in a matter of days. Trekking in Nepal will take you through a country that has captured the imagination of mountaineers and explorers for more than 100 years. You will meet people in remote mountain villages whose lifestyle has not changed in generations. Most people trust foreigners. Nepal is one of only a handful of countries that has never been ruled by a foreign power.
  • Annapurna Trekking Region:
  • The Annapurna Conservation Area is a well known trekking region. There are three major trekking routes in the Annapurna region: the Jomson Trek to Jomsom and Muktinath; the Annapurna Sanctuary route to Annapurna base camp; and the Annapurna Circuit, which circles the Annapurna Himal itself and includes the Jomsom route. The town of Pokhara usually serves as a starting point for these treks, and is also a good starting place for other short treks of one to four days, such as routes to Ghorepani or Ghandruk. The Mustang district, a former kingdom bordering Tibet, is also geographically a part of the Annapurna region, but treks to upper Mustang are subject to special restrictions. About two-thirds of all trekkers in Nepal visit the Annapurna region. The area is easily accessible, guest houses in the hills are plentiful, and treks here offer incredibly diverse scenery, with both high mountains and lowland villages. Also, because the entire area is inhabited, trekking in the region offers unique cultural exposure and experience. PLEASE Check Trekking package for Annapurna Region.
  • Everest Trekking Region:
  • The areas around Khumbu is commonly called as the Everest Region. It is also known as the home of Sherpa people and the mysterious Yeti. This trek comprises not only the Everest Base Camp but also Namche Bazar, Lukla, Tyangboche and the whole Solukhumbu, which are at the lap of looming Mount Everest, the highest peak in the world and also the mount Ama Dablam . The trek to Khumbu area is not only famous for trekking and expedition but also for the Sherpa culture. One can enjoy and learn Sherpa culture very closely by visiting this region. The complete trek starts from Jiri to Lukla. Flying to Lukla is the best option for those with limited time. Most of the flights depend on weather condition. However, the helicopter service and chartered flights are also available on request. The Everest Trek is one of the most thrilling adventure treks for excitement-seekers. There are several trekking routes within the Khumbu Region like Kalapatthar, Gokyo Lake, Everest Base Camp and Syangbochhe trek. PLEASE Check Trekking package for Everest Region.
  • Langtang Trekking Region:
  • Langtang is one of the nearest trekking destinations from Kathmandu and is an unparalleled combination of natural beauty and cultural riches. Langtang lies about 130 km north of the Kathmandu Valley close to the border with Tibet, China. It is Nepal’s first national park, and lies between the Himalayan range to the north, dominated by Langtang Lirung (7,245 m), the highest peak in the area, and smaller peaks to the south – Chimse Danda (ridge), Ganja La pass (5,122 m), Jugal Himal and Dorje Lakpa (6,989 m). The trek here is more adventurous as the area is visited by fewer tourists. Apart from the spectacular scenery, a visit to the area is an opportunity to explore the lifestyle and culture of the Tamangs, whose craftsmanship, language, dress and houses bear their uniqueness. Langtang is also known for its many glaciers – of which there are more than 70 of varying sizes – and high altitude lakes that include Gosainkunda, Parvatikunda, Bhairavkunda and Dudhkunda. The forests in the region have temperate and sub-alpine vegetation. Wildlife includes migratory birds, deer, monkeys, tahr and pika. PLEASE Check Trekking package for Everest Region.
  • Trekking to Ruby Valley Region:
  • The Republican of Nepal covers an area of 147, 181 square kilometers, and stretches 145-241 kilometers north to south and 850 kilometers west to east. The country is located between India in the south and China in the north. At latitudes 26 and 30 degrees north and longitudes 80 and 88 degrees east, Nepal is topographically divided into three regions. The Republican of Nepal covers an area of 147, 181 square kilometers, and stretches 145-241 kilometers north to south and 850 kilometers west to east. The country is located between India in the south and China in the north. At latitudes 26 and 30 degrees north and longitudes 80 and 88 degrees east, Nepal is topographically divided into three regions.
  • Trekking to Restricted Region:
  • Trekking in Restricted Area of Nepal needs special trekking permit. Environmentally, Culturally and politically very sensetive area of Nepal are listed as restricted area. Many places of Nepal are still controlled by the Government of Nepal to enter the foreigners. For the special purpose the area are controlled strictly to entry. Upper Mustang, Upper Dolpo, Manaslu, Tsum Valley, Kanchenjunga, Makalu are the popular trekking destinations needs special trekking permit from Government of Nepal.

    Officially there are no longer any restricted areas in Nepal. The immigration office rules now state that "trekkers are not allowed to trek in the notified areas previously known as restricted". Rather than get involved in all this semantic complication, the term "restricted" is used here to refer to places that are closed to trekkers, or open to trekkers only when accompanied by a policeman (a liaison or "environmental" officer). Our restricted area trekking package suggest you how to travel in these places. Most of the Tibetan border side places are consider as restricted area and possible to travel only with a liaison officer and pay for a special permit. The government of Nepal is fully responsible to grant the permit for the travel. If the police in the check post of this area found you without the permit, you will be turn back.
  • UNISCO Cultural Heritage Sightseeing Tours
  • The small mountain kingdom of Nepal is blessed with such astonishing and unique sites that within the area of 1,47,181 sq km Nepal holds a considerably high number of places recongnised by UNESCO (United Nations Educational Scientific Cultural Organisation) as 'World Heritage Sites'. There are altogether ten World Heritage Sites in Nepal, eight of them are cultural heritage sits which are mention below.
  • Kathmandu Durbar Square:
  • Kathmandu, the largest city of Nepal, is the political as well as cultural capital of the country. Kathmandu is a city where ancient traditions rub shoulders with the latest technological advances. However, it is the grandeur of the past that enchants the visitor whose gaze may linger on an exquisitely carved wooden window frame, an 18th century bronze sculpture or the spiritually uplifting stupas. Like any big city, Kathmandu has seen rapid expansion in the last decade, but despite the hustle and bustle so typical of metropolitan cities, its people remain as refreshingly friendly as ever. Retaining its ancient traditions, Kathmandu is blessed by a Living Goddess and is enriched by endless ceremonial processions and events that take to the streets every now and then with throngs of devotees seeking blessings. These religious festivals are steeped in legend and are quite a spectacle with chariot processions and masked dancers often possessed by the spirits of deities.
  • Patan Durbar Square:
  • Patan, also known as ‘Lalitpur’, the city of artisans, lies 5 km southeast of Kathmandu, and is home to the valley’s finest craftsmen who have preserved such ancient techniques as the repoussé and lost wax process used to produce exquisite sculptures. The city retains much of the old charm with its narrow streets, brick houses and multitude of well-preserved Hindu temples, Buddhist monasteries (vihars) and monuments. The predominant sound in Patan is that of the tinkering of craftsmen bent over the statuettes they are shaping. As in Kathmandu, Hinduism and Buddhism have co-existed here for ages, influencing each other, and the religious harmony is exemplary. Like its counterpart in Kathmandu, Patan Durbar Square is located in the heart of the city and was once the palace of the kings of Patan. The square is an enchanting mélange of palace buildings, artistic courtyards and graceful pagoda temples – a display of Newari architecture that had reached its pinnacle during the reign of the Malla kings. Among its numerous courtyards, the renovated Keshav Narayan Chowk has been converted into a bronze artifact museum. The Sundari Chowk with the sunken bath of Tusha Hiti is a showcase of exquisite woodcarvings, and stone and metal sculptures. The magnificent Krishna Temple with its 21 gilded spires, built in 1637, and the Manga Hiti, the sunken stone water spout, found in the palace complex are but a few examples of its opulence. The Krishna Temple, built entirely of stone, is said to be the first specimen of Shikhara-style architecture in Nepal.
  • Bhaktapur Durbar Square:
  • Located 20 kms from Kathmandu lies the Bhaktapur Durbar Square is also known as Bhadgaon and Khwopa in the local language. Bhaktapur Durbar Square is a conglomeration of pagoda and shikhara – style temples Bhaktapur is known as the ‘City of Devotees’, the ‘City of Culture’, the ‘Living Heritage’, and ‘Nepal’s Cultural Gem’. Bhaktapur is filled with monuments, most terra-cotta with carved wood columns, palaces and temples with elaborate carvings, gilded roofs, and open courtyards. The city is dotted with pagodas and religious shrines.
  • Changunarayan Temple:
  • The temple is a Unesco World Heritage site and this remarkable and historic temple of Changu Narayan dates from 1702, when it was rebuilt after a fire, however it is believed that the origins go back to the 4th century as most of the stone sculptures date from the Licchavi period (4th to 9th centuries) The double-roofed temple of Vishnu is situated on a hilltop at the eastern end of the valley, about 6km north of Bhaktapur and 22km from Kathmandu. Here we can find various forms Vishnu took, such as Narsingha man-lion incarnation, Vikrantha/Vamana, the six-armed dwarf. We can also find the figure of Garuda, the man – bird mount of Lord Vishnu, snake around his neck kneeling with hands in Namaste Position facing the temple and stone Lions guarding the wonderfully gilded door, which is flanked by equally detailed gilded windows. Two pillars at the front corners carry a conch and disc, the traditional symbols of Vishnu .In the northwestern corner there is a 7th-century image of Vishnu astride the Garuda, which is illustrated on the Rs 10 banknote.
  • Pashupatinath Temple:
  • The most sacred temple of Hindu Lord Shiva in the world, Pashupatinath Temple’s existence dates back to 400 A.D. The richly-ornamented pagoda houses the sacred linga, symbol of Lord Shiva. It is Located just 5 km north-east of Kathmandu UNESCO listed World Cultural Heritage Site. Appointed by the Pashupati Area Development Trust, only four priests can touch the idol of Lord Shiva and priests are always from south India. This custom is believed to be in practice by Sage Shankaracharaya from 6th century. The two level roofs of the temple are coated with gold and the four main doors are coated with silver.A Large Gold colored statue of Nandi the Bull is placed outside the western door.
  • Swyambhunath Temple:
  • Listed as UNESCO cultural heritage sites of Nepal. It is said to be around 2000 years old. The Stupa, which forms the main structure, is made of brick and clay supporting the lofty conical spire capped by a pinnacle of copper gilt. Painted on the four-sides of the spire base are the eyes of Lord Buddha. It is located about 3 kilometers west of the center of Kathmandu. It is situated on a hillock about 77m above the level of the Valley giving an admirable view of the Kathmandu Valley.
  • Boudhanath Stupa:
  • Stupa of Boudhanath lies 8 Kms East of Kathmandu. Built it in the 5th Century AD by Lichchhavi king Kana Dev is one of the biggest in the world that features all the eyes of Lord Buddha. It is built on an octagonal base, inset in the design of Mandala with prayer wheels. Stupa is located on the ancient trade route from Tibet which enters the Kathmandu Valley by the village of Sankhu in the northeast corner. Tibetan merchants have rested and offered prayers here for many centuries. When refugees entered Nepal from Tibet in the 1950s, many decided to live around Bouddhanath. The Stupa is believed to entomb the remains of Kassapa Buddha.
  • Lumbini:
  • Lumbini, the birthplace of Lord Buddha, in the Terai plains of Nepal is one of the greatest pilgrimage sites for Buddhists. More than 400,000 Buddhists and non Buddhists visit Lumbini every year. It is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site (Culture) and holds immense archeological and religious importance. Sacred Garden: It was here in the gardens of Lumbini that Prince Siddhartha Gautam, who later became the Buddha, was born in 623 BC. The nativity site is marked by a commemorative pillar erected by Mauryan Emperor Ashoka of India during his pilgrimage to the holy site in 249 BC.
  • Adventure for All
  • Nepal has some of the best trekking in the world, to and around several of the world's highest mountains, including Mount Everest. Many people visit the country just to trek and the tourism industry is well prepared to facilitate all manner of trekking styles and destinations. On the one hand you could spend a year planning an expedition to wild and lofty places; on the other you could land in Kathmandu with no plans and be on the trail to Everest Base Camp (EBC) in a matter of days. Trekking in Nepal will take you through a country that has captured the imagination of mountaineers and explorers for more than 100 years. You will meet people in remote mountain villages whose lifestyle has not changed in generations. Most people trust foreigners. Nepal is one of only a handful of countries that has never been ruled by a foreign power.
  • Everest Experience Flight Trip (Mountain Flight Trip):
  • Mountain flights offer the luxurious option of a Himalayan experience. The one-hour mountain flight from Kathmandu takes one close to the highest peaks, including Mt. Everest. During the flight, you get to see Gosaithan (also called Shisha Pangma), Dorje Lhakpa, Phurbi Chyachu, Choba Bhamare, Gaurishanker, Melungtse, Chugimago, Numbur, Karyolung, Cho-Oyu, Gyachungkang, Pumori, Nuptse and, of course, Everest. Mountain flights are offered by several airlines in the morning from the domestic airport in Kathmandu. Flights from Kathmandu reveal the Eastern Himalaya, while flights from Pokhara take you on a bird’s eye view of the Western Himalaya.
  • Paragliding Trip:
  • Paragliding is a relatively new adventure sport in Nepal, and is the simplest, safest and least expensive way of discovering the joys of flying alone to experience the aerial views of the magnificent Himalayas. Sarangkot, at 1,592 m above Lakeside in Pokhara Valley, is the jumping off point for paragliders. From here, one can take in stunning views of three of the world’s Eight Thousanders, namely, Dhaulagiri, Annapurna and Manaslu.
  • Bungy Jump Trip:
  • The ultimate thrill of a bungee jump can now be experienced in Nepal – 12 km from the Nepal-Tibet border, a three-hour bus ride from Kathmandu. The bungee jump was designed by one of New Zealand’s leading bungee consultants, and is operated by some of the most experienced jump masters in the business. The jump takes place from a 166 m wide steel suspension bridge that joins two sides of a deep valley over the raging Bhoti Kosi River. The place has spectacular scenery with dense forests covering the top of the cliff. One can overnight here and go rafting and rock climbing, too.
  • Mountain Biking:
  • Nepal’s diverse terrain makes it one of the best for mountain biking. Bike through the country and discover villages and small towns in the midst of rural serenity. Time permitting, it is even possible to explore the entire length and breadth of the country on a mountain bike. Bikes can be hired in Kathmandu and Pokhara.
  • Ultra Light Flight Trip:
  • Ultralight aircraft takes off from Pokhara and offers spectacular views of the lakes, mountains and villages. This is an ideal way to see life from a new perspective. Flights are operated almost throughout the year except during the monsoon (June through August). Flights take place from sunrise to 11 a.m. and from 3 p.m. to sunset every day, provided there are no rains. During the half- hour flight, one flies over Pokhara city, Phewa Lake, Sarangkot Hill and gets close to the Machhapuchhre mountain. Another option is to explore the Annapurna range from 12,000 feet or higher in an hour.
  • Zipflyer Adventure:
  • Nepal now offers the rush of extreme zip lining, the first of its kind in the whole of Asia. ZipFlyer Nepal is not just another zipline; it is the world’s longest, steepest and fastest zip-line to give you the ultimate adventure experience. Just imagine the adrenaline rush as you zip down at speeds of up to 140 km per hour on a cable 1.8 km long! The launch pad is situated at the peak of Sarangkot, Pokhara, offering most views of the Annapurna mountain range and the Pokhara Valley below. The ZipFlyer has been in operation since June 2, 2012. Safety is the leading criteria, and the system by Zip-flyer TM LLC, USA is designed with the most advanced technologies, and has delivered a state-of-the-art zipline. So get ready to experience the ultimate adrenaline rush!
  • Bird Watching:
  • Nepal’s varied elevations support more than 850 species of birds, or about 10 percent of the world’s total species. Migratory birds are seen in winters. The spiny babbler is unique to Nepal as it has yet to be spotted outside this country. More than 450 species of birds have been spotted in Chitwan National Park, while the Koshi Tappu Wetlands have been designated Asia’s finest bird watching site. The Mai Valley and Tamur Valley in east Nepal, Lumbini in central Nepal, and Dang Valley and Ghodagodhi Lake in the west are also good locations to sight exotic birds. As bird watching becomes immensely popular, specialized bird-watching tours are offered in the different national parks and wildlife reserves.
  • Chitwan National Park:
  • Nepal's First national Park. It is the first national park in Nepal It was established in 1973 and granted the status of a World Heritage Site in 1984. It covers an area of 932 km2 and is located in the subtropical lowlands of south-central Nepal. Altitude is ranges from about 100 metres (330 ft) in the river valleys to 815 metres (2,674 ft) in the Churia Hills. In the north and west of the protected area the Narayani-Rapti river system forms a natural boundary to human settlements. Adjacent to the east of Chitwan National Park isParsa Wildlife reserve, contiguous in the south is the Indian Tiger Reserve Valmiki National Park The coherent protected area of 2,075 km2 represents the Tiger Conservation Unit (TCU) Chitwan-Parsa-Valmiki, which covers a 3,549 km2 huge block of alluvial grasslands and subtropical moist deciduous forests.
  • Mammals
  • The Chitwan National Park is home to at least 43 Species of Mammals. The King of the Jungle is the Bengal Tiger. The alluvial floodplain habitat of the Terai is one of the best tiger habitats anywhere in the world. Leopards are most prevalent on the peripheries of the park. They co-exist with tigers, but being socially subordinate are not common in prime tiger habitat. Apart from these top predators Fishing Cat, Jungle Cats, Clouded leopards,Leopard Cat,Marbled Cats,Golden Jackle,Indian Wild Dogs, Sloth Bear,Bengal Foxes,Spotted Linsangas,Palm Civets Large,Small Indian,Civets several species of Mongoose,Binturon,honey Badgers and yellow throated Martens roam the jungle for prey. Striped Hyenas are rare and prevail on the southern slopes of the Churia Hills. Chitwan National Park is a major habitat of one horned rhinoceros which is only found in Nepal & India.
  • Elephant:
  • A lot of Lodges keep elephant at their lodge to entertain their clients for elephant Back Safari. Some time, wild elephant also come to park from Valmiki National Park India.
  • Gaurs:
  • Gaur spend most of the year in the less accessible Churia Hills in the south of the national park. But when the bush fires ease off in springtime and lush grasses start growing up again, they descend into the grassland and reverie forests to graze and browse. Apart from numerous wild boars also sambar deer, Indian muntjac, hog deer and herds of chital inhabit the park. Four-horned antelopes reside predominantly in the hills. Furthermore rhesus monkeys, hanuman langurs, Indian pangolins, Indian porcupines, several species of flying squirrels, black-naped hares and endangered hispid hares are present.
  • Birds:
  • Chitwan is the Paradise for the bird lover. Approximately, 550 species of bird has been recorded. It is much more than any other protected area in the world and about two-thirds of Nepal's globally Additionally,Black-Chinned Vuhina, a pair of Gould Sunbird, bloosom headed parakeet and one Slaty Breasted. Other Birds Found Bengal Florican,lesser Adjutant,grey crowned prinia,swamp francolin and Grass Warblers.other are Slender Billed babblers,Oriental arter,Egret, itterns,Stork,kingfisher,Indian spotted eagle,peafowl and jungle fowl Apart from the resident birds about 160 migrating and vagrant species arrive in Chitwan in autumn from northern latitudes to spend the winter here, among them the Greater Spotted Eagle Eastern Imperial Eagle and Pallas's Fish-eagle. Common sightings include Brahminy ducks and goosanders. Large flocks of bar-headed geese just rest for a few days in February on their way north. As soon as the winter visitors have left in spring, the summer visitors arrive from southern latitudes. The calls of Indian cuckoos herald the start of spring. The colourful Bengal Pittas and several sunbird species are common breeding visitors during monsoon. Among the many flycatcher species the Paradise flycatcher with his long undulating tail in flight is a spectacular sight.
  • Bardia National Park:
  • Bardia National Park is located in the Far-Western Region, Nepal and was established in 1988 as Royal Bardia National Park. Covering an area of 968 km2 it is the largest and most undisturbed wilderness area in the Terai, adjoining the eastern bank of the Karnali River in the Bardia District.

    The northern limits of the protected area are demarcated by the crest of the Siwalik Hills. The Nepalgunj-Surkhet highway partly forms the southern boundary, but seriously disrupts the protected area. Natural boundaries to human settlements are formed in the west by the Geruwa, a branch of the Karnali River, and in the southeast by the Babai River.
  • History:
  • In 1815, Nepal lost this region to the East India Company through the Sugauli Treaty. For 45 years it was a part of British India and returned to Nepal in 1860 in recognition for supporting the suppression of the Indian Independence movement in 1857. Today, this annexed area is still calledNaya Muluk meaning new country. An area of 368 km2 (142 sq mi) was set aside as Royal Hunting Reserve in 1969 and gazetted as Royal Karnali Wildlife Reserve in 1976. In 1982, it was proclaimed as Royal Bardia Wildlife Reserve and extended to include the Babai River Valley in 1984. Finally in 1988, the protected area was gazetted as national park.M

    The approximately 1500 people who used to live in this valley have been resettled elsewhere. Since farming has ceased in the Babai Valley, the natural regenerated vegetation makes the area a prime habitat for wildlife.
  • Vegetation:
  • About 70% of the park is covered with forest with the balance a mixture of grassland, savannah and riverine forest.
  • Fauna:
  • A group of gharials and a mugger on a sand bank of the Karnali RiverThe park provides excellent habitat for endangered animals like the rhinoceros, wild elephant, tiger, swamp deer, black buck, gharial, marsh mugger crocodile and Gangetic dolphin. Endangered birds include the Bengal florican, lesser florican, silver-eared mesia and Sarus crane. More than 30 different mammals, over 200 species of birds, and many snakes, lizards and fish have been recorded in the park's forest, grassland and river habitats. A good number of resident and migratory birds are found in the park. It is also the home of two of the last known herds of wild Asian elephants.
  • Trishuli River Rafting Facts:
  • Grade for Autumn: Year round 3 to 3+
    Grade for Spring: July 3 to Sept 4+
    Possible operation: Autumn & Spring
    Departure: Every day
    Rafting days: 02 days (KTM to KTM)
    Entrance by: 3 hours from Kathmandu & 4 hours from Pokhara
    Put-in point: Charaundi or Fisling
    Put-out point:Mugling or Simaltal / Gaighat
    River distance: 38 km.
  • Seti River Rafting Facts:
  • Grade for Autumn:3 to 3 +
    Grade for Spring: July 3 to Sept 4+
    Possible operation: Autumn & Spring
    Departure: Fix and on request
    Rafting days: 02 days (KTM to KTM)
    Entrance by: 5 hours from Kathmandu and 2 hours from Pokhara
    Put-in point: Damauli
    Put-out point: Gaighat
    River distance: 35 km.
  • Bhotekoshi River Rafting Facts:
  • Grade for Autumn: Oct – Dec 3 to 5
    Grade for Spring: Feb – May 3 to 4
    Possible operation: Autumn & Spring
    Departure: Fix and on request
    Rafting days: 02 days (KTM to KTM)
    Entrance by: Drive 5 hours east to 95 km. from Kathmandu
    Put-in point: Lomosangu- Dam
    Put-out point: Dolalghat Bazaar
    River distance: 20 km.
  • Kaligandaki River Rafting Facts:
  • Grade for Autumn: Sep – Dec 3 to 4+
    Grade for Spring: Feb – May 3 to 4
    Possible operation: Autumn & Spring
    Departure: Fix and on request
    Rafting days: 3 + 2 days (KTM to KTM)
    Entrance by: 30 - minute flight or a 6-hour drive to Pokhara
    Put-in point: Nayapul (70 km. / 4 hours drive from Pokhara)
    Put-out point: Mirme (105 km. / 5 hours drive back to Pokhara)
    River distance: 55 km.
  • Karnali River Rafting Facts:
  • Grade for Autumn: Sep - Dec 3 to 5
    Grade for Spring: Feb to May 3 to 4
    Possible operation: Round the year
    Departure: Fix and on request
    Rafting days: 10 days (KTM to KTM)
    Entrance by: 19 hours bus ride from Kathmandu led you to Surkhet
    Put-in point: Sauli
    Put-out point: Chisapani
    River distance: 180 km.
  • Sunkoshi River Rafting Facts:
  • Grade for Autumn: Oct - Dec 3 to 5
    Grade for Spring: Feb to May 3 to 4
    Possible operation: Round the year
    Departure: Fix and on request
    Rafting days: 10 days (KTM to KTM)
    Entrance by: Drive 3 hours east to from Kathmandu
    Put-in point: Dolalghat
    Put-out point: Chatara
    River distance: 270 km.